Dutch Oven Education

    • Feeding America: The Historic American Cookbook Project
      I just came across this Michigan State University Historic American Cookbook Project. Jan Longone, Curator of American Culinary History, Clements Library, University of Michigan, starts her introductory essay with the following two paragraphs: […]
    • See the “Charcoal Burn” at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site
      The colliers are often hard at work at Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site.  Their job is preparing and starting a charcoal burn. If you haven’t seen a charcoal burn this will be a special day because you will have the opportunity to see […]
    • Charcoal – From Hopewell Furnace to Kingsford – A Little History
      First, I will admit that the title of this post and these images are a bit misleading in that the two are not really related from the perspective of their intended use. But, from our perspective as Outdoor Dutch oven cooks the relationship is that […]
    • 5 Myths about Cast Iron
      This morning, I was listening to a Splendid Table on NPR  and the host, Lynne Rossetto Kasper, offered an interview between Noelle Carter and J. Kenji López-Alt, managing culinary director of Serious Eats. In that piece, J. Kenji López-Alt, offers […]
    • 18th & 19th Century Cookbooks
      I’ve been collecting a few 18th & 19th century cookbooks in an effort to better understand the recipes and cooking methods used during our Colonial period and to see how those recipes and methods evolved into the 19th century. My interest […]
    • The First Iron Pot Cast in Colonial America
      I know everyone has been stressing over this question, “Where was the first iron pot cast in the New World”? It turns out that the first pot cast in America was in 1646 in Massachusetts.  The furnace where it was cast was the Saugus Iron […]