Cornell Chicken

Cornell Chicken

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour, 50 minutes

Yield: 16 Chicken Quarters

This recipe came from http://amazingribs.com/recipes/chicken_turkey_duck/cornell_chicken.html and was posted by Meathead Goldwyn. If you like grilled chicken with golden crispy skin, say "thank you, to Bob Baker."

Baker was a professor of food science at Cornell University. A specialist in poultry, he helped invent such oddities as chicken nuggets, turkey ham, and poultry hot dogs. But in picturesque Ithaca, NY, where Cornell is located, about six hours north and west of Manhattan, he is best remembered for Cornell Chicken, and there is nothing odd or artificial about his wonderful recipe. In fact, the recipe has become so popular it is served all across Western New York.

Ingredients

  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup vegetable oil
  • 2 cups cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon table salt
  • 1 tablespoon poultry seasoning
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 4 broiler chickens cut into quarters

Instructions

  1. In a large bowl, whisk the egg white and yolk together with a balloon whisk or a hand mixer.
  2. Add the oil and whisk until it gets thick, homogeneous, and a bright yellow, for about 2 minutes. A balloon whisk is the best tool for this job since the wire strands really do a good job of emulsifying (mixing together) two ingredients that don't want to mix, one oil based, the other water, but a fork will do in a pinch.
  3. Now whisk in the vinegar, salt, seasoning, and pepper.
  4. Stab the chicken skin several times with a fork or knife so the marinade can get in and so fat can get out when cooking. This will help make the skin crispy.
  5. Marinate the chicken for 3 to 24 hours in zipper bags in the fridge. You can do this in a bowl or pan, but you need more marinade than if you use zipper bags. Every hour or so, turn the meat a bit so all surfaces get well coated.
  6. Set up the grill for 2-zone cooking. Try to get the indirect side in the 225°F range. If you're in a hurry, you can take it up to 325°F, but I prefer low and slow.
  7. Place the chicken over the indirect zone and close the lid.
  8. Every 5 to 10 minutes baste with the marinade, turn the chickens on both sides, and move the ones closer to the heat away and the ones away closer.
  9. Cook about 60 to 90 minutes until the internal temperature of each part is 150°F and stop basting. Exact time will depend on how thick the meat is, and how often you basted.
  10. Then move them over the hot direct heat side of the grill, skin side down, lift the lid, and crisp the skin without burning it for 10 to 15 minutes.
  11. Flip and heat for about 5 minutes more. This step is important to finish the cooking of the meat, crisp the skins, and make sure everything is sterile since raw egg can contain salmonella.
  12. When the skin is crisp and the temp is 165°F, take the meat off. Even if it is a bit red in there when you cut in, it is safe at 165°F. You cannot judge a chicken's safety by the color of the juices! I strongly recommend you use one of the fine new digital thermocouple thermometers available nowadays to make sure your poultry and other foods are cooked properly for taste and safety

Notes

For Dutch ovens you can fashion a wire rack that sits on a trivet inside the oven. It must be sturdy enough to hold the chicken parts being baked.

If you are using a grill and want more information about 2-zone cooking take a look at: http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/2-zone_indirect_cooking.html

About quartering the bird: The original recipe calls for cutting the birds in half, but I think it is better to quarter them since breasts and thighs cook at different rates, with the breasts being thicker, but less forgiving. You can overcook thighs and drums a bit and still have moist meat, but not breasts.

About the marinade: It is very close to a mayonnaise, so you can store the sauce in the fridge for a few days, even though there is raw egg, because the vinegar, salt, and cold will prevent salmonella from multiplying. Cooking it to 165°F, of course makes it perfectly safe. You can cut the recipe in half by discarding half the egg after whisking it

About the poultry seasoning: If you have some around, Simon & Garfunkel rub works fine. See: http://amazingribs.com/recipes/rubs_pastes_marinades_and_brines/simon_and_garfunkel_rub.html

http://www.valleyforgeblackpots.com/cornell-chicken/

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